The National Glass Collectors Fair

Heading: National Glass Collectors Fair

In Focus: 12 May 2019

Whilst updating the Preview Gallery for our May 2019 National Glass Fair we chose to highlight a few significant pieces of glass that were offered for sale on the day of the fair.


Roman Glass Jar

Roman Glass Jar With Trailed Decoration
Roman Glass Jar With Trailed Decoration

This is piece of glass is believed to be an authentic Roman glass jar. This small vessel is a pale blue twin-handled glass jar, dating from the 4th century AD (circa 350).

The jar is in excellent condition for its age.  Naturally this means that there is iridescence and age related wear and tear, which is consistent with an item that is 1700 years old.

The jar has a bulbous body measuring 6 cm in diameter at the rim.  The vessel reaches a maximum diameter of 7.5 cm and is 6.3 cm in height.  It is decorated with four trailed bands and a zigzag pattern in a deep blue/green glass. The two handles are made from the same darker glass. 

There is a tiny shallow chip to the bowl rim, but there are no other chips, cracks, significant scratches or any obvious evidence of restoration.  The jar shows significant iridescence due to the time it has spent buried underground.  It also has a collector's sticker to the base.

The vessel is made from soda metal and weighs just 62 g. 

An almost identical jar is featured in the book "Histoire de Verre L'Antiquité" by Florence Slitine on page 88 (available via Amazon). 

Provenance: With Pars Antiques in 1994 and since then in a private UK collection.

This item was available to purchase via Stand No. 30 - Hall 2.

 


Rene Lalique

Lalique sculpture made to commemorate the inaugural journey of the Pullman Express to the Cote d’Azur.
Lalique: Sculpture made to commemorate the inaugural journey of
the Pullman Express to the Cote d’Azur.

This glass sculpture is an outstanding example of the artistry and vision associated with the renowned glass maker René Lalique.

Lalique were specially commissioned to design this superb glass sculpture in 1929.

It is understood that only 200 examples of this figure were manufactured by Lalique.

The sculptures were created for presentation to dignitaries on the inaugural journey of the Pullman Express to the Cote d’Azur, which took place on the 9th of December 1929.

The statuette stands at around 15cm tall.

This item was available to purchase via Stand No. 07 - Hall 1.

Visit the 19th & 20th century glass gallery to view more examples of glass from this period that will be available to buy at our next glass fair.

Detail: R. Lalique signature & relief detailing the commemorative nature of this sculpture.
Detail: R. Lalique signature & relief detailing the commemorative nature of this sculpture.

 


Matz Borgstrom for Orrefors

Gallery Aerial Vase "Universe Big Bang" by Matz Borgstrom for Orrefors.
Gallery Aerial Vase "Universe Big Bang" by Matz Borgstrom for Orrefors.

 

This aerial vase was designed by Matz Borgstrom for Orrefors. The vase was included in the Orrefors Gallery selection in 1990.

During the 1980s and 1990s the Gallery selection was an annual showcase of the work created by designers working for Orrefors. The aim of the Gallery was to promote the designer's best work, which was produced in very limited editions.

This vase design is called "Universe Big Bang" and it is approximately 20cm tall. It was one of a series of four designs that Borgstrom produced for Orrefors in 1990. This example is fully signed, dated and numbered #6, from an edition of only 30.

A photo of the vase is included in the Orrefors Gallery 1990 booklet.  A used copy of the booklet will be included in the sale of this vase.

This item was available to purchase via Stand No. 31 - Hall 2.

You can view more examples of glass of this period and style via the May 2019
19th & 20th century glass gallery.


Usable Capacity Antique Drinking Glasses

Usable Capacity Antique Drinking Glasses
Usable Capacity Antique Drinking Glasses


Collectors will be aware that most Georgian and some pre-Georgian drinking glasses feature bowls with a small capacity. For drinking glasses that would still be usable today, Goblets are the category of glasses that would be considered large enough to be practical for use in the 21st century.

The champion of this category are the so called Newcastle light balusters, although nowadays not all glasses of this type are thought to have been manufactured in that region alone. This type of glass does not always need to be expensive, beautiful examples are readily available from a couple of good sources including exhibitors at the National Glass Fair. You certainly don't need to be a millionaire in order to add a few examples in your collection.

The group of six goblets are all excellent examples of their type.

Description from left to right:

  • An early four sided pedestal goblet showing distinct manufacturing striae on the bowl (ex private collection). C. 1715-1716.

  • An opaque twist composite goblet (see rear dust jacket of Bickerton for a stipple engraved example attributed to David Wolff). Ex Whittle collection via Bonhams. C 1765.

  • A large heavy bucket bowl goblet with neat baroque scroll work engraving around bowl, plus a domed and folded foot. C. 1730.

  • A typical 'Newcastle' but with a very nicely formed stem, sparkling metal and rare folded foot. Ex Whittle collection via Bonhams. C. 1755.

  • A much rarer and exclusive Newcastle light baluster with stand out stem. Featuring very fine quality engraving: depicting what is probably unique subject matter. Provenance available on request. C. 1765.

  • A fine Coin goblet of decent capacity, engraved with hops barley and fruiting vine. The glass probably commemorates an anniversary of some kind, or it may even have been a wedding gift. The silver sixpence is bent, which is typical, and as it dates to 1732, so it could well be contemporary to the glass. Provenance on request.

These items was available to purchase via Stand No. 52 - Hall 3.

For more antique and collectable drinking glasses, please visit the 17th, 18th, 19th & 20th Century Drinking Glasses & Tableware page, where you can view a selection of items that will be available to buy at our next glass fair.

 

Large 18th Century Sweetmeat Glass

Very Large 18th Century Sweetmeat Glass
Very Large 18th Century Sweetmeat Glass

An exceptionally large sweetmeat glass and cover. Both the bowl and cover are engraved with vine leaves and polished grapes. The stem has a teared angular knop and sits on a plain domed foot. The cover is original to the glass and features a facet cut finial.

The height, including the cover is 29.2cm.

C. 1730-40

This item was available to purchase via Stand No. 32 - Hall 2.

For more antique and collectable drinking glasses, please visit the 17th, 18th, 19th & 20th Century Drinking Glasses & Tableware page, where you can view a selection of items that will be available to buy at our next glass fair.

Large Sweetmeat Glass: Cover, Stem & Foot
Large Sweetmeat Glass: Cover, Stem & Foot

 


Thalatta Boxes

Three Thalatta Boxes by Bengt Edenfalk for Skruf.
Three Thalatta Boxes by Bengt Edenfalk for Skruf.

These three Thalatta boxes were designed by Bengt Edenfalk for Skruf around 1950.

Bengt Edenfalk (1924-2016) developed his Thalatta technique whilst working at Skruf glass works, from 1952-78. The technique is variation of the Ariel method of manufacture, where the motif design is applied to the encased glass whilst it is still hot. Air bubbles are then trapped in the glass. This makes the motif making process very difficult to control and many collectors are not aware of this particular glass making technique.

Edenfalk was the only person to work on this technique whilst at Skruf. 
Pieces are relatively rare, which makes them very collectable. 

When researching the three 'simple' motifs displayed on these boxes, it is evident that they are designs favoured by Edenfalk and he reused them many times on his 'busier' vases.

The history behind these particular Thalatta boxes is interesting and collectors would certainly get a lot out visiting the next National Glass Fair to take a look and have a chat about them. 

These items was available to purchase via Stand No. 62 - Hall 3.

You can view more examples of glass of this period and style via the May 2019
19th & 20th century glass gallery.